Recruiting Trends for 2015

#Career  #HRBlogs  #business

Job seekers are using these words and hash tags and sharing and liking updates and posts all over social media to land their next gig. How many employers are utilizing this same thing to attract their talent? What is branding all about? How can employers use social media to their advantage, and who is paying attention to this new trend in recruiting? Hash tags are quite possibly the ticket in to your ideal talent group. So let’s jump right in to the top recruiting trends for 2015!

According to a LinkedIn survey conducted in 2014, 4 years is the average length of time an employee stays at one job. Baby boomers cringe at this knowledge, because their worldview was much more about job security and company loyalty – keeping them at the same organization for 20+ years in many cases. The younger generations are in search of the next big thing; they are continuous job seekers, and their main loyalty is to improving their paycheck, career, status, etc. [tweetthis]With hiring budgets decreasing, social media is now a major factor in recruiting candidates.[/tweetthis]With hiring budgets decreasing, but the need for quality talent increasing as the skills gap continues to widen, social media is now a major factor in recruiting passive candidates (those who aren’t necessarily looking but are open to discussing new opportunities). Here are a few of the top trends to look out for, and how to make them work for your company – big or small!

1. TARGET your social media job posting – who are you looking for? You should be where they are! For example, LinkedIn groups focused on your target group, Facebook for the Generation X’ers, and Twitter and Instagram for the younger generations of millennials.

2. Make your recruitment functions entirely MOBILE – mobile job applications, mobile job postings, mobile apps for applying/searching.

3. Use the DATA at your fingertips – many recruitment software programs allow for data analytics. Use this information to find out what works for your company and what doesn’t, depending on the number of resumes submitted from various sources. I.E. are your Technical Web Developers seeing your job posts on Instagram or Twitter? What is the best source for posting for this group in the future? Where is the ideal talent pool hanging out?

4. BRANDING – what is your company brand? Is your brand recognizable? 60% of US leaders say that employer brand is a top priority in their company. What about yours?

5. Based on a report conducted by LinkedIn for Recruiting Trends in 2015, social professional networks are the top source of quality hires in the US. ASSIGN one employee in your HR department the task of keeping your company profile up-to-date on LinkedIn, as well as posting job opportunities, engaging in discussions within groups, and networking on LinkedIn.

6. Create a proactive TALENT BRAND STRATEGY. An astonishing 77% of US talent acquisition leaders say that talent brand has a huge impact on the quality of new hires. Engaging in social media to promote your brand is key!

Bullying – Is it happening in your workplace?

In the news lately there have been an overwhelming number of stories about children and adolescents being a victim to a bullying. Did you know that reports of workplace bullying are on the rise? It’s been a hot topic in the HR realm – adding anti-bullying policy to your handbook, but is it still happening in your workplace right under your nose? Are you missing some of the signs?

Teasing and banter is common in workplaces, but when does teasing cross the line? I’ve done some digging and found 3 helpful guidelines about when bullying may be happening right under your nose.

David A Davis, the National Director of Client Training at Ogletree Deakins, provides us the following guidance:

  1.  The teasing and banter is not returned. The person on the receiving end does not reciprocate the behavior.
  2. It is directed at one person only. The focus of the jokes is a single individual, not many.
  3. The banter is personal and generally focuses on weakness, deficiency, or inferiority.

These three signals may help us to better identify sensitive situations that could result in complaints of bullying. No one wants to work somewhere that is so uptight that banter is outlawed, but I think this lays the framework for when banter and jokes cross the line.

So now what?

It’s great to have an anti-bullying policy at work, but if that is where the effort stops, then the policy is falling short. Here are a few things you can do to minimize these sensitive situations:

  •  Train managers on the warning signs and encourage them to report sensitive situations or step in. By interrupting the sensitive situation, it puts a stop to situation. Once the situation has been stopped, work with the manager and employees involved to resolve and change behavior.
  • Do not wait and hope the situation will resolve itself, especially if the issue has been reported. Get involved and be armed with what is and is not acceptable behavior in the office.
  • Bring in a trainer and host a training session on workplace bullying. In the training, be sure to examine management styles to ensure managers are aware of behaviors of their own that may be construed as bullying.

Like all sensitive situations, it’s better to address them instead of sweeping them under the rug. Avoiding dealing with the issue could result in bigger issues down the road.

If you haven’t reviewed your anti-bullying policy in a while, it may be time! If you think your policy may need some revamping, Peoplescape can help!

 

Social Media and Recruitment

Love it or Hate it, social media is not going anywhere. Along with it comes the debate over whether or not to use it in recruitment and then, how and when to use it .

I’ve heard arguments on so many sides of it.

“Don’t Use It”
Social media profiles can give potential employers more information than they need to make employment decisions. For example, the photos may tell you information about age, gender, and national origin. The profiles may tell you about religious beliefs or sexual orientation. The content on their page may suggest political affiliation or show details about out-of-work activities that don’t pertain to employment decisions. The fear seems to be primarily around discrimination.

“Use It”
There are numerous benefits to using Social Media in your recruitment strategy. Employees can reach out into their networks and post about open positions and that leads increased engagement. Not to mention, you can reach passive job seekers more easily than using a standard job board.

Then there’s the question of how and when and which sites to use?

This question may be easier answered depending on the Social Media platform. For job postings, consider encouraging individual employees to post the link to your ATS on their social media platforms – Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn about open position in the company, especially if a number of your successful hires have come from referrals. This should also be embraced on a company level – embrace Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn as marketing and recruiting tools. From a recruiting standpoint (directly contacting potential candidates), I tend to prefer LinkedIn as it is the most popular Social Media site for posting about professional details.

I’ve heard discussion about researching a candidate’s social media profiles after you have selected your final candidates. This again could still put you in hot water with learning information about the person that is protected. There seems to be a lot of chatter about an employer’s ability to limit or monitor an employee’s off-work activities. The EEOC held a meeting last year to hear information about topics surrounding Social Media and one recommendation that came from an attorney in that meeting was to use a 3rd party company to review social media profiles to avoid the potential of seeing sensitive information.

All in all, I’m a supporter of leveraging social media to reach more potential candidates and increase engagement. The more people that see and share your job posting, the larger and better pool of candidates an employer gets to pick from! Where I draw the line? Beware of reviewing social media content on platforms like Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to make employment related decisions – there’s just too much sensitive information you may be able to pull from these sites to sway decision based on appearance, politic views, non-work activities, protected classes, etc. rather than on the merits of their skills and experience.

The Top 5 Healthcare Reform Facts You Need to KNow

Ask any recruiter or candidate looking for a job in HR, and 90% will tell you that the biggest change for 2015 and 2016 is health care reform. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as ACA or ObamaCare, has set out with lofty goals and mandated personal health care coverage, as well as encroaching on an employer’s decision to provide health benefits to its employees. It is no longer the employer’s choice, but is instead mandated that for certain provisions to be followed. So, you may ask, what are the top five things that you need to know regarding healthcare reform, specifically as it pertains to the workplace? Here’s your cheat sheet, so get ready to take notes!

#1 – Most individuals are now required to have medical coverage – which means in many cases, employers will have to evaluate their options and offerings to employees.
#2 – Employers with 50 or more employees will face penalties as of 2016 if coverage is not offered to full-time employees, however, coverage does NOT need to extend to spouses. Also, employers with 2-99 employees are considered “small group” in the insurance industry world and are given certain considerations to follow.
#3 – Small businesses may qualify for tax credits! This is great news for our small business clients. Of course, the details vary and are specific to each client, which is why we are here to answer your questions and offer the best solutions for your company’s needs.
#4 – Employers are required to inform their employees IN WRITING of their insurance options by means of Summary Plan Descriptions. Are your handbook and SPD’s in compliance with the health care reform act?
#5 – More good news! Your company could be eligible for a medical-loss rebate. What does this mean in language that we can all understand (rather than the convoluted text of ACA and other acts like it)? Basically, insurance companies are obligated to use 80-85% of their premium dollars directly for insurance claims or healthcare improvements. If they fail to meet that target, the employer is entitled to a rebate that is then distributed amongst the employees. The potential of getting money back is always a good thing!
Healthcare reform is a hot button topic right now, and Peoplescape wants to inform our clients of the loopholes and intricate details of this act as it pertains specifically to your organization. These top five facts are helpful to all employers alike, but we’d love to give you a more personalized analysis of how ObamaCare is affecting your workplace. Remember, knowledge is power and we’re here to share ours with all of our clients.

References: washingtonnational.com, obamacarefacts.com, optimahealth.com, hhs.gov

Seeking a “Digital Native”

The phrase “digital native” is a fairly new term that is being employed by a number of companies, particularly in the media, digital, start-up and tech worlds. Doing a quick google search for “digital+native+jobs”, I found the following:

An ideal candidate is a digital native, who has a passion for learning and always uncovering new opportunities in the digital space, and who has a solid grounding in the world of digital media and technology.” – for Sr. Digital Strategist at Saatchi & Saatchi LA

The Social Media Manager is a digital native, skilled in onsite attendee engagement in a face paced environment.” – for Social Media Manager at Oracle

“Requirements: Digital native and experience with Google Docs or Microsoft Office” – for Administrative Assistant at Revzilla.com

These are just a few of the many came up. So what is a “digital native”? According to the Oxford Dictionary a digital native is “a person born or brought up during the age of digital technology and therefore familiar with computers and the Internet from an early age.” On the surface it seems like a harmless phrase to throw on to a job description, in fact, it seems likely that an employer might want someone like this for a Social Media position; however, if being a digital native is a requirement as seen in some of the posts above, are you unintentionally sending a message of age discrimination?

Would you consider someone who was born 40+ years ago (1975 or before) to be a digital native? To put this in perspective, Bill Gates and Paul Allen founded Microsoft on April 4, 1975. So would you classify those born in this year as having been familiar with the internet and computers from an early age? Not to say that skills and competencies can’t be learned, but by definition, the term digital native seems to point more to a specific generational group.

The EEOC has not yet had a claim of age discrimination based on this qualification, but with claims of this type on the rise, I would venture to bet it is on the horizon. Furthermore, as we’ve seen in several cases, especially in California, statements such as the ones mentioned above can have an adverse impact on one (or more) protected classes by disproportionately hiring candidates under the age of forty.

At this point in time, I would use this phrase at your own risk, but seriously consider how and in what context you are using it.

Pinpoint: Interviewing Skills and the On-Demand Workforce

Interviewing potential candidates for a new job position can be tough.  Sharpen your skills with these quick tips from our hiring experts.  Also in this month’s issue: the unique challenges and benefits of the on-demand workforce.

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“Tell me now, right now …and change”

How do we manage performance (i.e. give and receive feedback, set objectives and coach) inside the new conversational context?

What does the new conversational context mean in today’s organizations?
People everywhere are tweeting, posting, communicating, connecting in real time. There is an authenticity of commentary and break-down in formal hierarchies. The need for immediate feedback that  this all brings, drives changes right now in how we are running our performance reviews and sharing with our people whats working and what isn’t.
Put these together and its telling us, we need authentic feedback in real time that can be shared openly in order to immediately build improvements into the processes, products or behaviors, before the day is even over.
Apps that allow this immediate feedback to be gathered, authentically and diplomatically and shared quickly enough to influence changes that can impact the outputs of current projects are going to be those that are adopted.
Today I heard about just such a system, developed by a small business … and the entrepreneur in me, lit up with excitement. I will share what I learn as I explore this market offering and feedback to you what I glean in real time.
@BelindaMorris www.peoplescapehr.com

“Culture Eats Strategy for Breakfast”

From as far back perhaps as our first fascinating high school biology class we couldn’t help pondering “the chicken or the egg”. We later learned that this dilemma and conclusion extended well beyond biology.Then came “nature or nurture”, psychology 101, and the plot thickened. There was something to sink our ideologically hungry, pre-adult teeth into at last. If you were anything like me, it took almost a decade to formulate a well balanced opinion giving them both a fair shake.The strategic business world seems to have been grappling with its own existential dilemma, “strategy or culture”. My still favorite quote from Peter Drucker, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast” was popularized in 2006 by Mark Fields the president of Ford. Until that point there was a whole lot of focus on strategy and quite a few upturned noses at culture change work, although being practiced in the mainstream by us large firm human capital consultants for some time. However, as one of those super, smart management gurus, Drucker’s remark may have just settled it… Culture does indeed eat strategy for breakfast, especially if it (the culture) doesn’t support, or isn’t aligned with that which the strategy is trying to achieve.  At last there’s one dilemma where an answer seems to have weighed in and conquered its opponent. However brilliant a strategy or business direction may be, it will never be successfully implemented if the culture does not support it and enable it to play out. The organization’s people have to ‘buy-in’ to the strategy, they have to be involved and genuinely believe that it makes sense to them, at this place, in this culture and at this time. They need to see how it all fits together and how easily the proposed strategy might flow out of a culture such as they have, for the strategy implementation to fly.Thanks to Dr. Drucker, we are able today to give organizational culture its rightful place on the boardroom agenda and on the lips of the most cynical, scientific managers and leaders.”Central to his philosophy is the view that people are an organization’s most valuable resource, and that a manager’s job is to prepare and free people to perform” quoted from the website of Peter F. Drucker & Matsatoshi Ito Graduate School of Business.

“From trashing to joining the modern workforce conversation”

People always criticize whats new. Change is scary, but the pace of change isn’t phased by our emotional preferences or blockages. The pace of today’s change is as fast as your internet connection on a high speed router. People who are under 35 years old today, will make up 75% of the global workforce by […]