Training Your Crew

At least one day per year, as required by the FAA, pilots and aviation crew attend training focused on lessons learned from accident reports, how to respond to emergencies, briefings on changing federal and company regulations and how to resolve or diffuse customer relations conflicts. Given the rapid pace of issues the aviation industry is faced with, one day per year is not sufficient but a mere single step in a multi-stage recurrent training program aimed at winning over the public’s trust and engendering their loyalty. After all, moving over 1.7 million people per day in planes up in the air must be taken very seriously.

Recurrent training for employees is serious business for most employers, and beyond the training that is required for “licensed” industries and state and federal mandated training (such as Sexual Harassment Prevention and Ethics for Public Officials Training), countless organizations do see the value of training employees and make the connection from training to their bottom line and the overall success of their businesses.

The Cost of Training Report from 2014 indicates $308,000 was spent on training by small businesses (under 100 employees). At that time, a whopping 43% expected to increase their training budgets in the following year. When asked, “Why did your budget increase?” 65% cited they would be increasing the scope of training.  This trend continued in 2016 and remains strong in 2017. Rapid ELearning that can be customized and delivered “On Demand” with completion tracking is easier to administer allowing businesses to link training to competency-based employee advancement.

What types of training do small businesses invest in?

  • Cross training for key positions.
  • Customer service skills training.
  • Industry and government compliance training.
  • Essential technology training.
  • New supervisor training.
  • Motivational training.

Even small businesses have something in common with commercial airlines “flying the friendly skies,” when they include in employee training lessons learned from accident reports, how to respond to emergencies, briefings on changing federal and company regulations and how to resolve or diffuse customer relations conflicts.