Bridging the Generation Gap

With the Greatest Generation (or “Traditionalists”), Baby Boomers, Generations X and Y, Millennials, and Linksters (or “Generation Z”) all snuggled up together in the workplace, it’s bound to be anything but boring!

For the first time in history, 6 different generations must come together in the workforce. Diversity is strength but with so many different work styles jumbled together, it comes as no surprise that this is one of the biggest challenges facing companies today.

Here are a few things to consider when managing the Generation Gap in your organization. The biggest mistake companies make? Pretending the gap doesn’t exist and not managing it at all.

Teach Your Supervisors About Generational Differences

One of the most important abilities good leaders possess is the ability to know what makes their employees “tick,” and much of this is generational in nature. While there is a wealth of knowledge online, Read more

Mentorship and the Future of Work

I am the product of baby boomer parents who survived an arguably sheltered millennial upbringing in Southern California. My parents’ generation boasts of having worked at the same company for 20+ years, and some will easily double that number before their retirement. Company loyalty is something that baby boomers value immensely, and as these things often go, they’ve raised a bunch of restless, challenge-crazed and adventure-seeking millennials. The generational differences not only change how employees work alongside each other in today’s age-diverse workforce, but it also impacts how leaders should structure the succession plans and mentoring programs at work to ensure that there is learning and development, rather than resistance and conflict occurring as we seek to build workplace relationships to strengthen our teams and the future of the company. Read more

Trends: Employee Tenure, a Two-Way Street with Employer or Fast Lane to a Better Job?

Long-held notions that longer tenure benefits both employee and employer continue to erode as the reported median length of employment spirals downward. In January of 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics,  the median number of years that wage and salary workers had been with their current employer was 4.2 years.  Down from 4.6 in 2014. Way down for select demographics and industries.

Not unexpected, among 16 to 19 years-old’s who were still exploring skills and careers, 74 percent reported having had a tenure of 12 months or less with their current employer. On the opposite end of the demographics, 55 to 64-year-olds reported a median of 10.1 years. Read more

Tips for First Time Supervisors

Taking on a supervisory role for the first time is exciting and overwhelming, but it doesn’t have to be. Start off on the right path by taking these steps to ensure a smooth transition into your new role.

Start Smart

Not just at the beginning, but throughout your career, make it your mission to learn everything you can. Chances are, you’ve been promoted into management because of your skills and attributes, not how much you know, so it’s important to stay humble and remember you don’t know everything. Look for the tools and resources your organization offers. Some companies have formal supervisory training, and nearly all have policy and procedure manuals and HR policies. Read them, ask questions about anything you don’t understand, and keep them in a place where you can access them easily. Read more

What can you learn about the candidate from awkward interview moments?

One of the most important interview skills you can have as a hiring manager is the ability to read people. HR professionals should be able to interact with employees of all levels from the entry level positions to the executive team. As a hiring manager, you should also seek to understand different perspectives and relate to your prospective new hires on various levels. The interview is much like a first date in that candidates are sure to present their best self to you, hoping to sell you on their positive attributes and land the job. As the interviewer, you should be prepared to notice and interpret a few awkward interview moments on this list, and to adjust your view of the candidate based on these mostly non-verbal cues. Get ready! Read more